Italiaans Brood

Focaccia
Focaccia is a flat oven-baked Italian bread product similar in style and texture to pizza doughs. 
It may be topped with herbs or other ingredients. 

Focaccia is popular in Italy and is usually seasoned with olive oil, salt, sometimes herbs, and may at times be topped with onion, cheese and meat. 
It might also be flavored with a number of vegetables. 

Focaccia can be used as a side to many meals, as a base for pizza, or as sandwich bread. 
Focaccia al rosmarino (focaccia with rosemary) is a common focaccia style in Italian cuisine that may be served as an antipasto, appetizer, table bread, or snack.


Ciabatta
Ciabatta is an Italian white bread made from wheat flour, water, salt, and yeast, created in 1982 by a baker in Verona, Veneto, Italy, in response to the popularity of French baguettes. 
Ciabatta is somewhat elongated, broad, and flat, and is baked in many variations.

While panino indicates any kind of sandwich regardless of the bread used (whether slices or a bun), a toasted sandwich made from small loaves of ciabatta is known as panini (plural of panino) outside Italy.



Stromboli
Stromboli is a type of turnover filled with various cheeses (typically mozzarella) and Italian meats (such as salami, capicola and bresaola) or vegetables. 
The dough used is either Italian bread dough or pizza dough.

Stromboli was invented in the United States in the 1950s. 
It was named after the Italian film Stromboli.

A stromboli is somewhat similar to a calzone. 
A calzone is a baked turnover stuffed with pizza ingredients. 
A stromboli is usually made by rolling up dough that has been topped with pizza ingredients and then baking it. 
A calzone is crescent-shaped, and a stromboli is usually shaped like a long rectangle. 
A calzone is served with tomato sauce on top of it or on the side, while a stromboli generally has the tomato sauce inside it. 
The question is complicated by the fact that there is some variation in what constitutes a stromboli.


Piadina
Piadina or Piada is a thin Italian flatbread, typically prepared in the Romagna region (Forlì-Cesena, Ravenna and Rimini). 
It is usually made with white flour, lard or olive oil, salt and water. 
The dough was traditionally cooked on a terracotta dish (called teggia in the Romagnol), although nowadays flat pans or electric griddles are commonly used.

The Piadina has been added to the list of the traditional regional food products of Italy of the Emilia-Romagna Region.


Pizzette
A pizzetta (plural: pizzette) is a small pizza that can range in size as a finger food at around three inches in diameter to that of a small personal-sized pizza.






Panettone
Panettone is a type of sweet bread loaf originally from Milan (in Milanese dialect of the Lombard language it is called paneton /paneˈtuŋ/), usually prepared and enjoyed for Christmas and New Year in Italy, southeastern France, Spain, Portugal, Slovenia, Brazil, Venezuela, Peru, Malta, Montenegro, Albania, Eritrea, Georgia, Germany, Austria and Switzerland, and is one of the symbols of the city of Milan.
In recent years it has become a popular addition to the Christmas table in the United Kingdom, United States, Canada, Puerto Rico and Australia. 
In South America, especially in Brazil, Peru, Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, Colombia, Bolivia, Chile, and Mexico. 
Each country names the special bread differently. 
In some countries it is a tradition to eat it on 7 January each year.[citation needed]

It has a cupola shape, which extends from a cylindrical base and is usually about 12–15 cm high for a panettone weighing 1 kg. 
Other bases may be used, such as an octagon, or a frustum with a star section shape more common to pandoro. 
It is made during a long process that involves curing the dough, which is acidic, similar to sourdough. 
The proofing process alone takes several days, giving the cake its distinctive fluffy characteristics.
It contains candied orange, citron, and lemon zest, as well as raisins, which are added dry and not soaked. 
Many other variations are available such as plain or with chocolate. 

It is served in slices, vertically cut, accompanied with sweet hot beverages or a sweet wine, such as Asti or Moscato d'Asti. 
In some regions of Italy, it is served with crema di mascarpone, a cream made from mascarpone, eggs, sometimes dried or candied fruits, and typically a sweet liqueur such as amaretto; if mascarpone cheese is unavailable, zabaione is sometimes used as a substitute.

Efforts are under way to obtain Protected Designation of Origin and Denominazione di origine controllata status for this product, but, as of late 2008, this had not occurred.
Italian Agriculture Minister Paolo De Castro was looking at ways to protect genuine Italian cakes from growing competition in Latin America and whether action could be taken at the World Trade Organization.